Morning Star

Joi T. Arcand, ēkāwiya nēpēwisi, 2017. Neon channel sign (pink). 120.7 x 182.9 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Joi T. Arcand, ēkāwiya nēpēwisi, 2017. Neon channel sign (pink). 120.7 x 182.9 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Joi T. Arcand, kiyām, 2017. Neon channel sign (yellow). 45.7 x 102.9 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Joi T. Arcand, kiyām, 2017. Neon channel sign (yellow). 45.7 x 102.9 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Bracken Hanuse Corlett, Ghost Food, 2017. Digital animation, 3:50 min. Courtesy of the artist.

Bracken Hanuse Corlett, Ghost Food, 2017. Digital animation, 3:50 min. Courtesy of the artist.

Alex Janvier, Key to Everyone, 1981. Gouache on paper, 36.8 x 50.8 cm. University of Toronto Art Collection. Gift of Michael Landauer, 2002.

Alex Janvier, Key to Everyone, 1981. Gouache on paper, 36.8 x 50.8 cm. University of Toronto Art Collection. Gift of Michael Landauer, 2002.

Nadya Kwandibens, Lisa Charleyboy, 2008. Chromogenic photograph, 50.8 x 76.2 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Nadya Kwandibens, Lisa Charleyboy, 2008. Chromogenic photograph, 50.8 x 76.2 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Nadya Kwandibens, Jarret Leaman, 2012. Chromogenic photograph, 50.8 x 76.2 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Nadya Kwandibens, Jarret Leaman, 2012. Chromogenic photograph, 50.8 x 76.2 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Nadya Kwandibens, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, 2016. Chromogenic photograph, 113.3 x 117.8 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Nadya Kwandibens, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, 2016. Chromogenic photograph, 113.3 x 117.8 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Nadya Kwandibens, Ronnie Dean Harris, 2016. Chromogenic photograph, 50.8 x 76.2 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Nadya Kwandibens, Ronnie Dean Harris, 2016. Chromogenic photograph, 50.8 x 76.2 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Garry Todd, Soap Berry, 2005-2006. Oil on canvas, 213.4 x 99.1 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Garry Todd, Soap Berry, 2005-2006. Oil on canvas, 213.4 x 99.1 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Adrian Stimson, (except 1) Burning Man Photo Essay: Buffalo Boy and Shaman Exterminator, 2005. Black & white silver gelatin photograph, 15.2 x 10.2 cm unframed. On loan from Hart House Permanent Collection.

Adrian Stimson, (except 1) Burning Man Photo Essay: Buffalo Boy and Shaman Exterminator, 2005. Black & white silver gelatin photograph, 15.2 x 10.2 cm unframed. On loan from Hart House Permanent Collection.

Adrian Stimson, (excerpt 2) Burning Man Photo Essay: Buffalo Boy and Shaman Exterminator, 2005. Black & white silver gelatin photograph, 15.2 x 10.2 cm unframed. On loan from Hart House Permanent Collection.

Adrian Stimson, (excerpt 2) Burning Man Photo Essay: Buffalo Boy and Shaman Exterminator, 2005. Black & white silver gelatin photograph, 15.2 x 10.2 cm unframed. On loan from Hart House Permanent Collection.

Adrian Stimson, (excerpt 3) Burning Man Photo Essay: Buffalo Boy and Shaman Exterminator, 2005. Black & white silver gelatin photograph, 15.2 x 10.2 cm unframed. On loan from Hart House Permanent Collection.

Adrian Stimson, (excerpt 3) Burning Man Photo Essay: Buffalo Boy and Shaman Exterminator, 2005. Black & white silver gelatin photograph, 15.2 x 10.2 cm unframed. On loan from Hart House Permanent Collection.

Adrian Stimson, Calling My Spirit Back (excerpt), 2017. Nine b&w digital prints, 27.9 x 21 cm each. Courtesy of the artist.

Adrian Stimson, Calling My Spirit Back (excerpt), 2017. Nine b&w digital prints, 27.9 x 21 cm each. Courtesy of the artist.

Curator
Darryn Doull and Jason Baerg
Start Date
13, Sep, 2017
End Date
29, Jun, 2018

Morning Star rises.

Waabanang is Ojibwe for Morning Star or the planet Venus. Morning star has been a beacon of light, serving as a navigational entity for Indigenous Peoples of this land for millennia. In response to the Jackman Humanities Institute’s 2017 annual theme, this exhibition of works by six Indigenous artists shines light on presence, visibility and agency of personal and collective dimension to renounce naïve impressions of (re)conciliation that continue to be propagated throughout much of the settler culture across Turtle Island. By opening personal, psychic and linguistic pathways that simultaneously guide to one and lead away from another, Indigenous kinship and survivance come into sharp focus.

Anamnesis propels Morning Star into the future as the reminiscent past and partial present moment set the compass for the national body politic. While the research of the JHI queries apology as a labored apparatus addressing indelible violence and the effects of conciliation alongside acknowledged colonial shame, may the individuals represented in this exhibition and the creators who manifest their likenesses guide both the thought and action of this immediate community and beyond. Informed by the full herstory of this land and Indigenous Traditional Knowledge, we must walk alongside one another with respect to succeed.

Morning Star rises.

Opening Reception: Wednesday September 13, 2017, 4-6pm
The Jackman Humanities Institute

Our Supporters

We gratefully acknowledge the operating support from the Canada Council for the Arts and the Ontario Arts Council, with additional project support from The Jackman Humanities Institute, the University of Toronto MVS Curatorial Studies Program at the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design, and Manulife Financial.

All exhibition photographs by Toni Hafkenscheid, 2018.