Soundscapes at UofT

JHI Working Group active in 2019-2020

 

A soundscape is a sonic environment. Like the concept of landscape, soundscape has accumulated cultural meanings that indicate the framing of an environment in terms of sound. A great deal of ongoing work at the University of Toronto intersects with studies of sound, space, and place, yet researchers are scattered across three campuses at least a dozen disciplinary units. The goal of this new group is to gather researchers with acoustic-spatial and sonic-environmental interests and/or investments in sonic-artistic practices. This cross-disciplinary group will highlight sound in contemporary humanities discourses, particularly in context of the Jackman Humanities Institute's environmental focus with the 2019-2020 theme of Strange Weather, and it will engage the creative sphere, including sound art as a signifying articulation of space. Our meetings will include discussions of new and in-progress works, at least one guest, and at least one sound walk in Toronto.

Leads

  • Joseph Clarke, FAS Art History
  • Sherry Lee, Faculty of Music

Faculty, University of Toronto

  • Mitchell Akiyama, Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape & Design
  • Marla Hlady, UTSC Arts, Culture & Media
  • Lewis Kaye, UTSC Arts, Culture & Media
  • Brady Peters, Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape & Design
  • Lilian Radovac, UTM Communication, Culture, Information & Technology
  • Stephen Scharper, UTM Anthropology

Librarian, University of Toronto

  • Margaret English, Art Library

Graduate Students, University of Toronto

  • Nil Basdurak, Faculty of Music
  • Liora Belford, Art History
  • Alexandra Fiori, Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape & Design
  • Laura Fox, Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape & Design
  • Emily MacCallum, Faculty of Music
  • Sadie Menicanin, Faculty of Music
  • Tegan Niziol, Faculty of Music
  • Rupert Nuttle, Art History
  • Sherry Ostapovich, Faculty of Education
  • Zachary Weinstein, Philosophy
  • Eric Woodley, Art History