2019-2020

Learning, or Unlearning, Collectivist Traditions? Economic and Social Change in a Cape Breton Fishing Community

Submitted by Sonja Johnston on Mon, 02/24/2020 - 08:33

Julie Zatzman is a doctoral candidate in the OISE Department of Adult Education & Community Development and is the 2019-21 Amilcare Iannucci Graduate Fellow in the Humanities. Julie's doctoral research aims to shed light on an increasingly urgent question: why, with all the alarming news concerning the state of the environment and climate change, do some communities take progressive action, while others do not? Julie provided the text for this post.

The Children of Margaret Thatcher and Stuart Hall

Submitted by Sonja Johnston on Mon, 02/10/2020 - 08:03

Daniel McNeil is the first person to hold the Visiting Public Humanities Faculty Fellowship at the JHI. He obtained his PhD in History from the University of Toronto in 2007 and brings to the Fellowship many years of experience nurturing interdisciplinary communities, fostering innovations in pedagogy, and leading public outreach work in Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom.

Drawn North: Magnetic Men and the Circulation of Arctic Knowledge, c. 1818-75

Submitted by Sonja Johnston on Wed, 02/05/2020 - 13:40

Faculty Fellow Mark A. Cheetham’s second presentation at our Fellows' Lunch on the ‘Strange Weather’ theme–Drawn North: Magnetic Men and the Circulation of Arctic Knowledge, c. 1818-75–took the form of an exploratory preview of an exhibition project he is undertaking with colleague Jordan Bear from the Art History department.  Faint Images will examine the image cultures of communication technologies in 19th-century Arctic voyaging from Britain and the USA.

Fellows' Spotlight: Chiara Graf

Submitted by Sonja Johnston on Wed, 01/29/2020 - 13:15

Chiara Graf is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Classics and a 2019-2020 Chancellor Henry N.R. Jackman Graduate Fellow in the Humanities. Her research while at the JHI is titled "Wisdom and Other Feelings: Affect, Knowledge, and the Senecan Subject" - an examination of the relationship of affect and natural science in the works of the Roman philosopher, scientist, and tragedian Lucius Annaeus Seneca (c.1 BCE-65 CE). She asks a number of questions:

A Pandemonium of Hope: Oil, Aspiration, and the Good Life in Alberta

Submitted by Sonja Johnston on Wed, 01/15/2020 - 16:20

Judith Ellen Brunton is a doctoral candidate in the Department for the Study of Religion and a Chancellor Henry N.R. Jackman Graduate Fellow in the Humanities. Her research project at the JHI explores how oil companies, government agencies, and community organizations in Alberta use oil to describe a set of values about land use, labour, and aspiration. Oil, in Alberta, is a key symbolic element in imagining what a good life is. Most of the text of this post was provided by Judith.

Public Studio: Fusing Environmentalism, Indigneous Rights and Technology

Submitted by Sonja Johnston on Thu, 12/12/2019 - 13:36

Public Studio, JHI’s Artists in Residence for 2019-20, is the collaborative art practice of filmmaker Elle Flanders and architect Tamira Sawatzky. For a recent Thursday Fellows’ Lunch they treated us to a brief retrospective of a few of their exhibition works before giving us a preview of their newest installation opening in January 2020. The following text was provided by Public Studio, with contributions from Kimberley Yates.

The Gadachrili Regional Archaeological Project Expedition (G.R.A.P.E)

Submitted by Sonja Johnston on Wed, 12/04/2019 - 12:48

Khaled Abu Jayyab (Ph.D. Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations, University of Toronto, 2019) is JHI’s Community-Engaged Early Career Fellow. Khaled’s fellowship research focuses on diachronically understanding human responses to changes in environmental conditions through changes in settlement organization and subsistence strategies, bringing a time-depth perspective to discussions of contemporary climate change.